Supporting a Competitive City: The 2020 Census

March 9, 2020

A competitive Kentucky and a competitive Louisville both rely on an accurate Census count. Louisville, KY receives a portion of this money through Census data. The US government provides over $675 billion in grants, funds, and support to states, cities, and communities. The distribution of these funds is based on Census data.

Locally, Census-related funds touch all of the Greater Louisville Project (GLP) deep drivers (education, jobs, health, and quality of place). Schools, roads, hospitals, and public works are just a few of the programs and initiatives funded by Census-based federal funds. Metro Government uses Census data for emergency preparedness and public safety. Real estate developers use Census data to plan new home construction. Businesses rely on Census data in deciding where to relocate, where to build, and where to create jobs. Residents use Census data to advocate for policies, programs, and initiatives that improve the quality of place.

An inaccurate count will cost Louisville dearly. For every unaccounted person, the state of KY loses $2021, per year, for ten years. Children are the most undercounted group. If a child is not counted, they will not be counted again for ten years. Any funds that may have been able to help them through these crucial years, will miss them. The community will lose out on funds for KCHIP, SNAP, WIC, school lunch programs, and Medicaid.

This year, the Census will be available to take online or on a mobile smartphone. Local and federal officials are encouraging as many people as possible to complete the Census online. Phone, mail-in and in-person options will still also be available. Federal law prevents Census Bureaus from releasing any personal information.

There will be no citizenship question on the Census.

Quote from Census.gov:

Everyone living in the 50 states, District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories (Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) is required by law to be counted in the 2020 Census.

Everyone residing in Louisville during the Census needs to be counted. The Census is available in multiple languages. Phone translations assistance will also be available.

In order to achieve a complete count, Louisville needs Census workers. Many part-time jobs are available at the National Processing Center in Jeffersonville. Neighbors can be paid to encourage neighbors to complete the Census. For those interested in Census jobs, click here. The website can also be translated into other languages.

One more reason to support an accurate count is to support GLP. GLP heavily relies on Census data. The data allows us to measure both local success and challenges. Government leaders, business leaders, members of the philanthropic community, and residents use GLP data to advocate for effective civic change.

The Census is a vital tool in the work of GLP and in making a thriving, equitable Louisville.

  • To learn more about local Census efforts, click here.
  • To download Census outreach materials, click here.
  • From Metro United Way: Text COUNTMEIN to 51555 to get the official link to fill out the Census in March! The Metro United Way will have Mobile Census Labs in various areas of the community to help ease the digital divide and help residents complete the Census online.

References 

Census 2020 Complete Count https://louisvilleky.gov/government/resilience-and-community-services/census-2020-complete-count#why

https://2020census.gov/

https://metrounitedway.org/why-the-census-counts/

https://www.courier-journal.com/story/opinion/2020/01/03/census-2020-urge-kentucky-lawmakers-fund-complete-count/2729263001/

See what Kentucky Youth Advocates Research Director, Amy Swann has to say about the 2020 Census

June 22, 2020

See what Metro United Way Director of Engagement, Mandy Simpson has to say about the 2020 Census

June 22, 2020

See what Kentucky State Representative, Attica Scott has to say about the 2020 Census

June 22, 2020